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Moving To Hawaii

Weather and Seasons In The Hawaiian Islands

An Overview of Hawaii’s Climate

Hawaii basically has just two seasons, winter and summer.

The weather is slightly cooler during the winter, though still quite tropical and warm. There is more rain during the winter, but sunny days are also common.

During winter you may need a sweatshirt or light jacket to keep warm during some brisk nights, but during the days temperatures are still often balmy and tropical. Temperatures in Hawaii are usually in the 70’s and 80’s during the daytime, all year around.

Due to the prevailing northeasterly trade winds, some areas of the Islands are wetter than others. Weather patterns in the Hawaiian Islands may also vary a bit depending on the locations of particular mountain ranges and other geographical features.

In general, the eastern (windward) sides of the islands tend to get more rain showers, as do the north shores. The west and south shores tend to be drier and hotter.

No matter what time of year it is, sunny conditions can almost always be found somewhere on the west and south shores, while the east and north shores are also sunny most of the time though usually a bit cooler and breezier.

Higher elevation areas can be much chillier, such as the Upcountry region on Maui, Kokee State Park on Kauai, and of course atop the Big Island Volcanoes of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea where snow is common.

However, most visitor accommodations are near sea level, and vacationers usually just visit the higher elevation areas and then return to the warm tropical weather near the coast.

Ocean temperatures in Hawaii are pleasant all year around. The water is about 78 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer and dips only a few degrees during the winter months. This is warm enough for an enjoyable swim without any need for a wetsuit.

Many surfers wear a “spring suit” – a short, thin wetsuit – during the winter months, especially if they are in the water a long time. However, many surfers choose to surf without a wetsuit, even during winter.

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Katie Minkus, R(BIC)

July 21, 2009

Aloha, Dan…

Interestingly enough, the top of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea mountains aren’t the only places that get CHILLY on the Big Island!!

Upcountry Waimea, also known as Kamuela – birthpace of the Paniolo (Hawaiian Cowboy) gets pretty darn cold at night, especially in the winters when it can get down into the low 50’s and high 40’s with rain whipping sideways. Also, up mauka from Honoka’a and other spots on the Hamakua Coast – there are plenty of homes and big ranches that rest in the 3,000+ foot elevation – again, think chilly enough (sometimes even in the summer) to actually USE a fireplace! And then of course, there’s Volcano Village and the surrounding subdivisions… the only place I’ve been so far on the BI where I had to wear socks in June to keep my toes from freezing off!!

Many visitors to the Big Island – especially from chilly winter environs – wonder why would anyone choose to live up mauka where its cooler?? But that’s exactly why these places are such popular areas for residents. Much of our island population is employed by the hotels along the hot, dry, leeward Kohala “Gold” Coast and they live and work all day sweating in the heat and humidity. They tell me they LOVE going home at the end of a hot, steamy sweaty workday to cool down at night and sleep well in the chillier air.

Me? I still prefer Puako – warm and yes, it can be downright uncomfortably hot – especially in September/October. But then again, when it gets to be too much… I simply jump into the ocean and swim with the honu! Ahhhh… paradise!

Katie Minkus, R(BIC)

July 21, 2009

Aloha, Dan…

Interestingly enough, the top of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea mountains aren’t the only places that get CHILLY on the Big Island!!

Upcountry Waimea, also known as Kamuela – birthpace of the Paniolo (Hawaiian Cowboy) gets pretty darn cold at night, especially in the winters when it can get down into the low 50’s and high 40’s with rain whipping sideways. Also, up mauka from Honoka’a and other spots on the Hamakua Coast – there are plenty of homes and big ranches that rest in the 3,000+ foot elevation – again, think chilly enough (sometimes even in the summer) to actually USE a fireplace! And then of course, there’s Volcano Village and the surrounding subdivisions… the only place I’ve been so far on the BI where I had to wear socks in June to keep my toes from freezing off!!

Many visitors to the Big Island – especially from chilly winter environs – wonder why would anyone choose to live up mauka where its cooler?? But that’s exactly why these places are such popular areas for residents. Much of our island population is employed by the hotels along the hot, dry, leeward Kohala “Gold” Coast and they live and work all day sweating in the heat and humidity. They tell me they LOVE going home at the end of a hot, steamy sweaty workday to cool down at night and sleep well in the chillier air.

Me? I still prefer Puako – warm and yes, it can be downright uncomfortably hot – especially in September/October. But then again, when it gets to be too much… I simply jump into the ocean and swim with the honu! Ahhhh… paradise!

chance

November 13, 2014

who would not love to live in hawaii?!

chance

November 13, 2014

who would not love to live in hawaii?!

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