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Hawaii’s Kīlauea Volcano Erupts in Two Locations With Record High Lava Levels

If you haven’t seen it in the news by now, I’m here to tell you that Hawaii’s Kīlauea Volcano, located in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, is alive and flowing in two separate locations!

Within the park, the vent at Halema’uma’u Crater (or Lava Lake) began to rise earlier this week. On Sunday, April 26th, it was reported by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory that the lava had risen within 3 meters (about 10 feet) from the vent rim. If inflation at the summit continues and the lava flow continues to rise, it is possible that it will spill onto the floor of Halema’uma’u Crater.

Lava Lake in Halema'uma'u as seen from the Jaggar Overlook, Friday, April 24th. Photo taken by Mark Wasser, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park employ

Lava Lake in Halema’uma’u as seen from the Jaggar Overlook, Friday, April 24th. Photo taken by Mark Wasser, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park employee

Due to these record high lava levels, the eruption is easily viewable from many viewpoints, including the closest viewing point – the overlook at the Jagger Museum. If you think that this is something you don’t want to miss and soon find yourself headed to the park, do take note that due to the high levels of Lava Lake, be prepared for crowded conditions and heavy traffic during peak visitation times between sunset and 9pm. Luckily, the park is open 24/7. With that being said, park rangers encourage visitors to come either before or after these peak times to ensure optimal viewing (between 9pm – 5am).

The second location of Kīlauea Volcano eruption is at the Pu’u ‘Ō’ō vent located about 10 miles East of the summit. Unfortunately, this location is on the remote east rift zone of Kīlauea and is not accessible to the public.

Another angle of Lava Lake in Halema'uma'u as seen from the Jaggar Overlook, Friday, April 24th. Photo also taken by Mark Wasser, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park employ

Another angle of Lava Lake in Halema’uma’u as seen from the Jaggar Overlook, Friday, April 24th. Photo also taken by Mark Wasser, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park employee

You can also view live panorama footage of Kīauea “lava lake”.

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Tracy Stice

May 8, 2015

Julie, This is exciting to see. I remember the first time I saw the Pu’u O O vent was in 1983 when I was driving my lumber truck from Honoka’a to Hilo to drop off Koa from my mill at the pier. Lava was shooting hundreds of feet in the air and I could see it from about 50 miles away. It was just spectacular. Pele proceeded to take Kalapana , the black sand beach, and it almost got the painted church which was moved by a huge community effort. Five years ago, I got to spend 3 days for the Hawaii Association of Realtors Leadership academy at Kilauea Military Camp. Each morning, I would get up real early and walk the path along the rim of the crater and enjoy steam baths from the steam vents.

Hawai’i is such an alive island and is a rare chance to enjoy creation in the purest sense .

Thank you for the blog and pictures.

Tracy Stice

May 8, 2015

Julie, This is exciting to see. I remember the first time I saw the Pu’u O O vent was in 1983 when I was driving my lumber truck from Honoka’a to Hilo to drop off Koa from my mill at the pier. Lava was shooting hundreds of feet in the air and I could see it from about 50 miles away. It was just spectacular. Pele proceeded to take Kalapana , the black sand beach, and it almost got the painted church which was moved by a huge community effort. Five years ago, I got to spend 3 days for the Hawaii Association of Realtors Leadership academy at Kilauea Military Camp. Each morning, I would get up real early and walk the path along the rim of the crater and enjoy steam baths from the steam vents.

Hawai’i is such an alive island and is a rare chance to enjoy creation in the purest sense .

Thank you for the blog and pictures.

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