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Big Island

Stories of Hawaiian Lava

As anyone who has been to Hawaii knows, we’ve had a continuous lava flow since January 3, 1983.

 

That’s 28 years of awesome fiery beauty. Anyone knowing anything about our culture also knows that Madame Pele is the reason. The beautiful goddess brings new life to our islands daily. She never tires. If you close your eyes, you can see her playing with her fiery balls of newly formed earth. Her current project being Lo’ihi Seamount.

 

Scientists say that we may see the peaks of this island break through the surface of the Pacific Ocean in a hundred years or so

Many kama hele travelers to our Big Island have been told not to take lava from the island or some pilikia (unwanted/harmful) will happen to you. A belief has been ingrained into a lot of people. There is a book with the stories of the pain kama hele suffer upon returning back to their home with their souvenirs only to return them immediately because of events experienced once they reached home.

Yes, this makes a great tale to fascinate and scare any kama hele, but let’s really feel this. Madame Pele is creating lava 24/7. She sits atop Kilauea Crater creating her fiery virgin soil. She plays with her lava—never running out. Do you think she would mind you taking a piece of it home? Are you thinking she doesn’t have enough to share with others? For goodness sake, she’s making a whole island for us. Of course she shares.

 

There are different stories describing how this myth came to be. The one that makes me giggle (and makes the most sense to me) is the one of the tour bus driver telling this tale to his flock because, back in the day, he had to clean his own bus. Lava is black, crumbly soil and gets into every nook and cranny once it is stepped on by tourists getting on and off the bus. Imagine how time intensive cleaning would have been.

Today this story is being told (in part) because of the strong need of the local people to have the kama hele ho’ihi (respect) the land and the people. When telling this story, we are asking you to come here with ho’ihi and reverence for the land and the people. Come, visit, we are willing to share our aloha spirit—and we have a lot to give.

We are an island people. We know our roots. We know our ku’auhau (family history). We know our kupuna (grandparents and elders). We know how to live and survive on an island. Ask and we’ll teach you. Need lava for your garden back home? Would love a beautiful piece of lava to place in your hearth by the fire that warms your hale (home) and ohana (family)? We gladly share. Just ask, “She who shapes the sacred land”—Pelehonuamea.

 

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Pat Strausse, R

March 30, 2011

Lucy, I feel very blessed to know you and to experience your
outlooks on life here on the Big Island. I love your belief that pele is willing to share, and yes she can and does make more lava every day. Amazing that one tour bus driver could start such a widespread belief. Reminds us all that we can
have a powerful influence on our world so best to always come from the truth. Thank you for sharing this blog with us.

Pat Strausse, R

March 30, 2011

Lucy, I feel very blessed to know you and to experience your
outlooks on life here on the Big Island. I love your belief that pele is willing to share, and yes she can and does make more lava every day. Amazing that one tour bus driver could start such a widespread belief. Reminds us all that we can
have a powerful influence on our world so best to always come from the truth. Thank you for sharing this blog with us.

Lucy

March 30, 2011

We are very powerful and need to be aware of our thoughts always. Mahalo for your mana’o Pat

Lucy

March 30, 2011

We are very powerful and need to be aware of our thoughts always. Mahalo for your mana’o Pat

Kathy Awai, R(S); ABR

March 30, 2011

Well, here is my story about three of my NYC friends who came to visit me when I lived in Waimea. Two of them were Portuguese from Brazil, where they believe in all sorts of spirits Santarias)and omens so telling them the stories about people taking lava rock home when we visited the new Kalapana flow around 1992 was a no brainer; they didn’t want anything unpleasant occuring and weren’t about to take chances. The 3rd gal, Carol, took several rocks home and within 2 weeks, they came back. Here is what happened to her upon leaving the Big Island. One, she got stuck in Chicago in a freak snow storm overnight that messes up her travel plans and cost her extra money and then upon arriving back to her apartment in the city, she lost her keys. She called me the next day and said the return trip was a pretty miserable experience and she was sending the rocks back. Coinsidence? Probably, but I don’t walk under ladders either…but that’s just me.

Kathy Awai, R(S); ABR

March 30, 2011

Well, here is my story about three of my NYC friends who came to visit me when I lived in Waimea. Two of them were Portuguese from Brazil, where they believe in all sorts of spirits Santarias)and omens so telling them the stories about people taking lava rock home when we visited the new Kalapana flow around 1992 was a no brainer; they didn’t want anything unpleasant occuring and weren’t about to take chances. The 3rd gal, Carol, took several rocks home and within 2 weeks, they came back. Here is what happened to her upon leaving the Big Island. One, she got stuck in Chicago in a freak snow storm overnight that messes up her travel plans and cost her extra money and then upon arriving back to her apartment in the city, she lost her keys. She called me the next day and said the return trip was a pretty miserable experience and she was sending the rocks back. Coinsidence? Probably, but I don’t walk under ladders either…but that’s just me.

Lucy

March 30, 2011

Mahalo for sharing, Kathy. Our beliefs are very powerful.

Lucy

March 30, 2011

Mahalo for sharing, Kathy. Our beliefs are very powerful.

Katie Minkus, R(BIC)

April 8, 2011

Aloha Lucy. There is just something so incredible about the energy and the power of new land being created every moment of every day… And to think we are so blessed to be able to live here and experience madame Pele at her best! Your description of her as a playful, giving woman has struck a cord with me – recognizing that I see this spirit reflected in the actions of so many of our fellow island residents every day – and that this certainly must be a big part of what our visitors feel as the “aloha spirit.” Thank you for the reminder, our beliefs ARE very powerful. Now I believe I will create my next home to be on the oceanfront side of Puako Beach Drive…

Katie Minkus, R(BIC)

April 8, 2011

Aloha Lucy. There is just something so incredible about the energy and the power of new land being created every moment of every day… And to think we are so blessed to be able to live here and experience madame Pele at her best! Your description of her as a playful, giving woman has struck a cord with me – recognizing that I see this spirit reflected in the actions of so many of our fellow island residents every day – and that this certainly must be a big part of what our visitors feel as the “aloha spirit.” Thank you for the reminder, our beliefs ARE very powerful. Now I believe I will create my next home to be on the oceanfront side of Puako Beach Drive…

Lucy

April 8, 2011

Aloha Katie – I have no doubt you will have a home on the oceanfront side of Puako!

Lucy

April 8, 2011

Aloha Katie – I have no doubt you will have a home on the oceanfront side of Puako!

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